Tag Archives: UK London

A Thai gastronomy in London

We’ve been in London lots of times but we always get disappointed about the food. We went to visit our Londoner couple-friends who invited us to a gastronomic tasting at a Thai restaurant in Forest Hill. The quality of the food, the ambience and the service are impeccable. We shall go back there again!

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Welcome sign in Thai

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I have loads of this umbrellas bought in Thailand donkeys years ago, this is an awesome way to display them!

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Love that green chicken curry!

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a very warm presentation!

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Cocktails a la caribbean!

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I like the cutlery…quite awkward to manipulate though

London’s West End

How do I describe the West End?
..It’s a must-see in the light where you can sit in Leicester Park and watch street performers, media personalities, camera-toting tourists or London fashionistas go by
..It’s a must-be-there in the dark when it comes alive owing to the bars and clubs located in little streets off leicester square
– It’s a must-watch-a-musical at least once in your lifetime
and as bonus;
– it’s a must-catch-a-movie-premiere with its red carpets, the glitzy gowns and the limousines…

The West End, along with Soho, is what they call in London parlance, the Theaterland, the heart of performing arts because it is where a big number (more than 50!) of theaters and cinemas are found. If you want to experience the highest level of theatre in the Theater Capital of the World, then this is the place.

Unfortunately, I was there at the time when Britain’s freak snow was just about ebbing away so there were no street performers that day but it was still crowded with tourists nonetheless.

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This is where you can buy your tickets at half the price over what you would pay at the box office

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Giving away flyers for a comedy show. There was a promo that night; from 12GBP regular price of a ticket, they were slashing it to half (6GBP)

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a multiplex cinema

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The Empire Theater and Casino

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Odeon Leicester Square boasts of having the largest screen in Europe

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Leicester park, in the centre of Leicester square, has the statues of Charlie Chaplin and William Shakespeare

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The underground Gentlemen’s restroom. The underground Ladies’ is on the other side. Even if you cannot read the sign, the male and female busts by the entrance will give you the idea.

A Day Out in London

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 London “black” cab no longer – it’s now psychedelic cab

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The London Tube

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St Pancras Station

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That doesn’t stop me from getting confused

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Architectura moderna

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Big Ben
This clock has become the symbol of the United Kingdom and London. It is the world’s largest, four-faced, chiming clock and the third largest, free-standing clock tower in the world. It celebrates its 150th birthday in 2009.

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Little Ben
This cast-iron miniature version of Big Ben was erected in 1892 in Victoria Street. For 75 yrs it was the meeting place for French people outside Victoria Station before they catch their train to the channel ferries. It was removed from the site in 1964, re-erected in 1981 as a little symbol of Franco-British love. It tells British Summer Time permanently so that for half the year it tells French time rather than English.

Little Ben has this little apology for summertime:

My hands you may retard or may advance
My heart beats true for England as for France

The Blue Plaques of Britain

While walking around London, I noticed some blue round stickers glued on public walls. I thought their purpose was purely comical but after googling “blue signs england”, I learned that there are actually Blue Plaques and their purpose is purely commemorative.

Hence these blue stickers are just the “celebrities’ version” of the real thing:

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This is the real Blue Plaque I’ve seen. I found it in Brighton:
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England

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 City Hall of London.  The shape is sometimes called a misshapen egg, a motorcycle helmet but its mayor refers to it as a glass testicle.

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Parliament Building.  The neo-gothic Houses of Parliament with the Big Ben
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The Tower Bridge…. so-called because it is near the Tower of London
Built in the second half of the 19th century, it is actually designed as a drawbridge to allow river traffic

 The eternal rain and cold in this country has led to the term “English weather”..You don’t go to this country worriying about the cold, after all, it is still charming!

The countrysides are pretty, the matured trees, the hilly landscapes, the cottage houses, the gardens and the very charming facades of pubs and shops are what makes England very lovable.